Going for a Kindle Scouting Merit Badge, Part 2

Before I start begging for nominations again, let me vent. I just made some absolute-last-minute edits to Altered Seasons: Monsoonrise. The reason was that in a few scenes I caught Isabel thinking of and referring to her father as “Dad” (how I think of my father) rather than “Pop” (how she thinks of her father). So I had to go back and change those. As a writer, this is the sort of inconsistency you have to watch out for. If you have an editor—especially a highly recommended editor who’s being paid upwards of $500—this is the sort of inconsistency that editor is supposed to catch. It’s a lot more important than, say, making sure year numbers are written out in dialogue. * * * I learn

Going for a Kindle Scouting Merit Badge, Part 1

Well, the time I was planning to spend writing, I mostly spent preparing for publication. Specifically, I’m running a Kindle Scout campaign for Altered Seasons: Monsoonrise. What is Kindle Scout? I’ll let them explain: Kindle Scout is reader-powered publishing for new, never-before-published books. It's a place where readers help decide if a book gets published. Selected books will be published by Kindle Press and receive 5-year renewable terms, a $1,500 advance, 50% eBook royalty rate, easy rights reversions and featured Amazon marketing. Emphasis added. Featured Amazon marketing. Sweet. All I have to do is… persuade everybody in my social network, plus a bunch of people I don’t even know

I Hate Chicago, Illinois Nazis

I have discovered a new curse of being a writer—the Style Nazi. This is a kind of editor you don’t run into as an independent author. As an independent author, you’re doing well if you find an editor who can do basic proofreading and notice discrepancies in the story. (Me, for instance.) The Style Nazi is kind of like a Grammar Nazi, but more professional. He or she is usually a high-end editor who has committed the Chicago Manual of Style to memory. Coming from the world of journalism, I was raised on AP Style, so there’s obviously a certain potential for conflict. Now I’m okay with using the Oxford comma. I don’t mind not having spaces on either side of my em dashes—you’ll notice I left

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